Teaching Matters Expands with Launch of a New York City Public School Network

Thu, 01 Aug 2013:

For immediate release
Contact: Sharon Rubinstein, 212-870-3505, ext. 8, cell 703-901-7947, srubinstein@teachingmatters.org

Teaching Matters Expands with Launch of a New York City Public School Network

(New York, NY) – July 31st, 2013

Teaching Matters, Inc., a non-profit with nearly twenty years of service in over half of New York City’s schools, is expanding its scope. The New York City Department of Education recently named Teaching Matters a Partnership Support Organization (PSO), and 24 schools are now within its network. The network launched on
Monday, July 1st.

“We are thrilled to be embarking on this venture,” said Lynette Guastaferro, Teaching Matters’ Executive Director and the current network leader. “It’s a great opportunity to gain insight from our new relationship with schools, share what we’ve learned over the years, and build a collaborative model that we believe will bring great returns to New York City educators and their students.”

Teaching Matters is one of nearly 60 networks, grouped in five clusters citywide. Network teams bring together experts who can help schools with a wide array of instructional and operational support.

The network will give Teaching Matters a platform for researching and disseminating best practices in teacher effectiveness, data-informed instructional techniques and strategies, and shared leadership and accountability.

At the same time, Teaching Matters will continue to operate its current successful and valued professional
development programs in New York City and elsewhere in the region. Schools are able to buy supportive services that run the gamut from short-term targeted consulting to our more comprehensive services called Teaching for Impact. Schools can also continue to purchase our other highly regarded offerings, such as Writing Matters and Voices & Choices.

“We believe that our continuing professional development services and our new network will be synergistic. We will be researching the impact of our programs on an ongoing basis, and modifying our practice in all schools to reflect what we learn,” said Guastaferro. “We couldn’t be more eager to grow as an organization.”